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Georgia Southern online MBA program is top 30 in the nation
gsu-eagl

Georgia Southern University's College of Business Administration Online Master of Business Administration program has been named one of the nation's Top 30 Best Online MBA Programs by BestColleges.com.

The university's Online MBA was ranked 18th in the national rankings.

According to BestColleges.com, the school rankings are compiled using information from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System and College Navigator databases. Both databases are maintained by the National Center for Education Statistics. The publication takes the list of schools and includes only those with at least two of four data points which included acceptance rate, retention rate, graduation rate, and enrollment rate.

BestColleges.com states that every school was ranked against the others for each data point, and all data points were weighted equally. Georgia Southern's online MBA posted in each category: 49 percent for admissions rate, 65 percent for enrollment rate, 77 percent for retention rate, and 50 percent for graduation rate. These four points cover the school's assessment of students, student opinion of the school and student success once enrolled.

"We are excited to see the ranking and believe it reflects the hard work of our faculty and staff, along with the quality and dedication of our students," said Allen C. Amason, the dean of the College of Business Administration. "The challenge now is to stay on this cutting edge and continue adding value to our MBA and other programs. So, we are excited about the ranking, but we're even more excited about the future."

The online MBA is offered through the Georgia WebMBA program, a 30-hour program that appeals to working professionals from a broad business background.

The College of Business Administration has undergraduate and graduate accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

 

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