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Angela S. Gerguis, M.D. earns ‘Fellow’ status
Dr. Angela Gerguis

Angela S. Gerguis, MD, of Statesboro, Georgia, recently earned the designation Fellow of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. 

The Academy is the professional organization for physicians who care for patients with serious illness.  Advancement to fellowship status within the Academy honors dedication to and scholarship in the field of the hospice and palliative medicine. 

Dr. Gerguis is the medical director at Ogeechee Area Hospice in Statesboro.  She received her medical degree from The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis and trained in Family Medicine at The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Chattanooga at Erlanger Medical Center.  Following residency, she moved to Statesboro to start private practice in Family Medicine, and is currently also a physician at the Georgia Southern Health Services Center. 

Dr. Gerguis received the designation during the closing plenary session of the Annual Assembly of Hospice and Palliative Care in Orlando earlier this year, joined by 3,300 colleagues working in the field of hospice and palliative care

The Fellow of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine status is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a physician member. Dr. Gerguis has demonstrated a significant commitment to the field of hospice and palliative medicine and we celebrate her achievement.

The American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine is the only national medical specialty society for hospice and palliative medicine. 

Since 1988, the Academy has supported hospice and palliative medicine through professional education and training, development of a specialist workforce, support for clinical practice standards, research, and advocacy. 

Its membership includes more than 5,000 physicians and other healthcare professionals committed to improving the care of patients with serious illness. 

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