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Want to be a weather spotter?
Class Monday teaches how to record, report severe conditions
Weather spotter Web

If you are tired of just talking about the weather and want to actually do something, a class Monday may help you accomplish that goal.
The National Weather Service will conduct a “weather spotter” class in Statesboro for anyone interested in learning how to record and report weather conditions.
Ron Morales, a meteorologist with the Weather Service, will teach the class at 3 p.m. Monday in the Bulloch County 911 Emergency Operations Center adjacent to the Bulloch County Jail, said Ted Wynn, the county’s public safety director.
As of Friday evening, 20 people had signed up for the class, said Bulloch County 911 Director Kelli Barnard. There are about 20 spaces remaining and slots would be filled on a first-come, first-served basis, Wynn said.
People may apply for a spot in the class until just before it gets underway at 3 p.m. Monday, unless the class fills up before then, Barnard said.
Wynn said the class will last “a couple of hours.”
The class will certify participants as official National Weather Service weather spotters.
According to the Service’s website (www.noaa.gov), weather spotters “are part of the ranks of citizens who form the nation's first line of defense against severe weather.”
The National Weather Service “encourages anyone with an interest in public service and access to communication to join,” according to information on the website. “Volunteers include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and other concerned private citizens.”
Individuals affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches, nursing homes or who have a responsibility for protecting others are also encouraged to become a spotter.
Training covers understanding the basics of thunderstorm development, storm structure, identifying potential severe weather features, severe weather safety and how to report information.
Anyone interested in the training should contact Wynn or Barnard at (912) 489-1991 or (912) 764-0110.

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