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SPLOST renewal passes
Funds to go to improvements, special projects
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Bulloch County voters approved the renewal of the Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) Tuesday night, meaning for at least six more years, one penny out of the county’s 8 percent sales tax will continue to fund improvements, special projects and much-needed public safety equipment.

The referendum passed at 58.89 percent (12,981 votes.

There were 9,062 residents who voted against the renewal (41.1 percent).

Until October, Bulloch County’s sales tax was at 7 percent, but votes approved a T-SPLOST that added an eighth penny to the sales tax, to be used for road improvements and other transportation needs.

This SPLOST renewal is expected to reap $62 million between now and 2025.

SPLOST is used exclusively for capital outlays for infrastructure, facilities and equipment, and not operations and maintenance as the property tax is used for. SPLOST proceeds are shared with Brooklet, Portal, Register and Statesboro by a formal agreement.

The SPLOST renewal will help fund Statesboro projects such as upgrading and expanding greenways and parks, police and fire vehicles and equipment, and solid waste vehicles and equipment.

The city of Portal is considering building a park, community and senior citizen center, as well as making aesthetic improvements to the town including water tank replacement and buying a new police car, Brooklet hopes to remodel the community center exterior, pave some roads, and purchase new police vehicles, while Register plans to use its SPLOST money to 'mostly continue to upgrade (the) water system, and use some for equipment and adding a bathroom to the playground.

Bulloch County expects to use SPLOST funds to focus on solid waste improvements; a new, upgraded public safety radio system; expansion of the Bulloch County Jail; and equipment and upgrades for public safety and recreation. 


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