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Bank certified as 'Great Place to Work'
Queensborough

Queensborough National Bank and Trust recently was awarded official national certification as a “Great Place to Work.” 

“We are thrilled to receive this designation and hope it will help us recruit and retain talent in today’s competitive environment,” said Sheryl Reed, Queensborough’s vice president of human resources. 

Queensborough operates a branch in Statesboro at the corner of South Main St. and West Grady St.

In 2021, Queensborough was named Best Small Bank in Georgia by Newsweek magazine and the bank is marking its 120th anniversary in 2022. With 350 employees, the bank has doubled in assets over the past five years and has more than $900 million in loans to community members.

In 2021, Queensborough employees logged more than 1,000 volunteer hours. In addition to their time, Queensborough has supported various local causes with other resources. In the past year, the bank has:

Made donations to local hospitals and organizations in the communities we serve 

Celebrated a 10th year of partnership with Golden Harvest

Employees raised close to $40,000 for the Georgia Cancer Center, United Way and other local causes.

A Great Place to Work is a company founded in 1992 and has surveyed more than 100 million employees since its inception in creating its Great Place to Work certification process. Certification is a two-step process that includes surveying a company’s employees and completing a short questionnaire about the company’s workforce.

“Certification is the most definitive ‘employer-of-choice’ recognition that companies aspire to achieve,” said Beth James, Queensborough’s director of marketing, in a release. “It is the only recognition based entirely on what employees report about their workplace experience – specifically, how consistently they experience a high-trust workplace.” 

Every year, more than 10,000 companies across 60 countries apply to get Great Place to Work-Certified. 


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