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The Statesboro Youth Ballet to display the art of movement on April 2-3
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Ten local and area dancers will display their athletic abilities and artistic talents during “An Evening of Modern Dance” on April 2-3 at the Emma Kelly Theater.

Ten local and area dancers will display their athletic abilities and artistic talents during “An Evening of Modern Dance” on April 2-3 at the Emma Kelly Theater.

Statesboro Youth Ballet members Ana Grace Evans, Annie O’Neill, Caroline Spivey and Janelle Spivey, SYB alum Laural Boyles and Madelyn Wolfe, and guest dancers Emma Vickers, Anna Coghill, Ella Warren and Jillian Ley as well as Averitt Center Director of Dance Taylor Ellen will perform in the 45-minute program which focuses on artistic expression through full-body movement. Evans, O’Neill, Boyles, Vickers and Ellen choreographed the pieces.

“One of the main purposes of Modern Dance,” explained Ellen, “is to create something completely different than ballet. In modern dance, you get the bare feet, the floor work, and inward rotation of legs and the range of motion of the body in comparison to the vertical posture, rotation of the legs, and very specific codified technique and precision of classical ballet. If you watch videos of it, especially early modern dance, you can really see the clear difference and the 'rebellion' so to speak that was occurring among the early pioneers of modern dance.”

Due to strict social distancing guidelines, reserved seating is very limited and will be sold only at Averitt Center Main Gallery (33 East Main Street) or by calling the ticket office at 912-212-2787. Tickets are $20 for adults, $18 for Averitt members, first-responders, active or retired members of the military and city of Statesboro employees, and $12 for youth and students. The event is sponsored exclusively by Jim and Betsy Nichols. 

“In many ways, it’s modern art, a period of art in which previous traditions were thrown aside to create something unique. It can be about anything, movement for movement’s sake, a story, a thing, and emotion, etc., and because of this I think it opens up more possibility for audiences to relate to it and be affected by it,” Ellen added.   


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