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I-16 traffic stop leads to meth arrest of East Dublin man
Sheriff's K9 alerts deputies of the presence of narcotics in the car in which suspect was riding
Jeffrey Thomas Kuyk
Jeffrey Thomas Kuyk

An East Dublin man admitted to "cooking" methamphetamine Friday after a Bulloch County sheriff's K9 alerted deputies of the presence of narcotics in the car in which the man was riding.

Deputy Travis Smallegan pulled a car over on Interstate 16 Friday, near the 127 mile marker, for "multiple traffic violations," said Capt. Jason Kearney, head of the Bulloch County sheriff's Crime Suppression Team. 

A woman was driving, and a man, Jeffrey Thomas Kuyk, of South Elm Street in East Dublin, was a passenger, he said.

Bulloch County sheriff's Deputy Dustin Lanier joined Smallegan at the scene, along with his K9 partner Pike, who performed a "free-air sniff" of the vehicle and alerted to the presence of narcotics, Kearney said.

K9 Pike
An East Dublin man admitted to "cooking" methamphetamine Friday after Bulloch County sheriff's Deputy Dustin Lanier's K9 partner Pike alerted deputies of the presence of narcotics in the car in which the man was riding. (Photo courtesy Bulloch County Sheriff's Office)

A subsequent search revealed "pipes commonly used to smoke methamphetamine and multiple plastic baggies commonly used to package narcotics," he said. "Deputy Smallegan continued his search, and in the trunk of the vehicle, he located all of the necessary ingredients needed to manufacture methamphetamine."

Kuyk, 38, "admitted to Smallegan that he had been 'cooking meth' and that all of the items found in the vehicle belonged to him. "

The female driver was released with no charges. Kuyk was taken into custody and charged with possession of drug-related objects and manufacturing methamphetamine.

Kuyk was taken to the Bulloch County Jail, where he remains without bond pending further court action, according to jail records.

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