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Apartment moratorium, blight tax on tap for 4 p.m. city session Tuesday
Alcohol license fee vote during 5:30 meeting
City Statesboro
City of Statesboro

Statesboro City Council’s latest doubleheader of public meetings will begin at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, with a “work session” at Joe Brannen Hall, 58-A East Main St., and continue next door with the regular meeting at 5:30 p.m. inside City Hall.

Tuesday’s 4 p.m. presentation and discussion topics are the moratorium on new apartment complexes proposed last month by Councilman John Riggs, the “blight tax” ordinance previously proposed by Councilman Phil Boyum, alcoholic beverage special events permits and the 2020 U.S. census.

No votes are scheduled during the work session, but it is an open, public meeting, and these matters can obviously be presented for votes at upcoming regular meetings.

 

Alcohol fees

One item on the agenda for a vote during Tuesday’s 5:30 p.m. regular meeting is adoption of license fees aligned with the different types of businesses defined in the rewritten Alcoholic Beverages Ordinance.

Special six-month licenses were issued effective last July 1 to reset the annual start date to Jan. 1 going forward. The ordinance defining new license categories was then adopted at the Oct. 1 meeting, but without the schedule of fees.

Alcoholic beverage license fees proposed for adoption Tuesday are $1,750 for package sales; $4,300 for a bar; $2,500 for an event venue; $750 for low-volume sales, such as at a salon that serves wine; $5,600 for a pub; and $2,800 for a restaurant.

The proposed resolution will also temporarily waive late fees, which would otherwise be imposed after Nov. 1 for alcohol license renewals under, until Dec. 1. However, the city would still impose a $200 late fee after Dec.  1.

A proposed $643,792 contract for rehabilitation of sanitary sewer mains is among other items on the agenda.

Last month City Manager Charles Penny began scheduling a work session for reports and discussion at 4 p.m. in the Joe Brannen Hall, a city-owned, ground-floor meeting space, before the council’s second regular meeting of each month.

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