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Videos and photos captured the widespread damage of collapsed Miami bridge
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Emergency personnel work at the scene of a collapsed pedestrian bridge at Florida International University on Thursday, March 15, 2018, in the Miami area. The brand-new pedestrian bridge collapsed onto a highway crushing multiple vehicles and killing several people. (WTVJ NBC6 via AP) - photo by Herb Scribner
Videos and photos of a pedestrian bridge collapse have begun to make their way online.

On Thursday, a new pedestrian bridge collapsed on a major highway in the Miami area outside of Florida International University, killing six people and injuring at least 10 people, according to the Associated Press.

"This is a tragedy that we don't want to re-occur anywhere in the United States," said Juan Perez, director of the Miami-Dade police. "We just want to find out what caused this collapse to occur and people to die."

Florida politicians listed a "stress test and loosened cables as possible factors" for why the bridge collapsed.

Several people were under the bridge when it collapsed, prompting emergency crews to load them into ambulances and begin search and rescue missions.

Social media users released videos of the incident to Twitter and Facebook in the minutes following the event.

Sky News published a video that showed crushed cars beneath the bridge.

ABC News shared a video from the WPLG news station that captured high-angled footage of the collapsed bridge.

WSVN-7 News pointed out the collapsed bridge from a high angle as well.

KPIX CBS in San Francisco posted a video on Facebook of emergency responders tending to the bridge.

Jonathan Munoz tweeted a photo from behind yellow caution tape of the aftermath.

Twitter user Megan Fernandez shared a photo from the road after the bridge broke.

Another user, named Britt, tweeted out a handle of photos from the destruction site.
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