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Love and labor: Dentists most likely to be married, paper hangers least
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Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the American Community Survey, Businessweek looked at jobs and marital status over 60 years. In the 1950s, power plant operators topped the list of the occupations filled by married people. In 2010, it was dentists, who have consistently been in the top 10 over the course of the entire 60 years. - photo by Lois M. Collins
Marriage may be work, but work also says a lot about the chances you'll be married. An analysis by Bloomberg Businessweek of job holders and their marital status reveals some interesting tidbits for the marriage-minded.

Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the American Community Survey, Businessweek looked at jobs and marital status over 60 years. In the 1950s, power plant operators topped the list of the occupations filled by married people. In 2010, it was dentists, who have consistently been in the top 10 over the course of the entire 60 years.

There's no particular point looking for a spouse among corporate CEOs, sales engineers or many medical professionals, either; they're already married at a high rate. Practical nurses, on the other hand, are among the most likely to have been divorced.

Paper hangers top the list of the most likely to have been divorced. Manufacturing jobs are also well represented on that list, presented by Businessweek in graphic form by Francesca Levy and Dorothy Gambrell.

Creative fields like artist and writer made the top 10 divorced list a few decades ago, but they've dropped off in favor of the manufacturing trades, postal clerks and social welfare clerks.

As for those who are widowed, the top spot belongs to crossing guards, Levy writes.
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