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10 religious world records you've probably never heard of
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The Roman Catholic Church has more Christians than any other religious denomination with more than 1.1 billion members. Its leader, Pope Francis, is one of the most recognizable faces in the world. - photo by Marco Campagna, istockphoto.com/neneos

        Pastor Zach Zehnder wanted to break a world record and help a charity. He did so this weekend by speaking for more than 50 hours - setting a new world record for the longest speech, which was previously held at 48 hours, 31 minutes, according to WFTV-TV, a local news station in Orlando.
        "According to his website, he started preaching at 7 a.m. Friday. He didn't stop until 12:21 p.m. Sunday, exceeding his goal to speak 50 hours," WFTV reported.
        According to The Blaze, the rules of the Guinness World Records gave Zehnder "a five-minute break every hour. His sermon was to be an overview of the Bible. The lengthy talk raised money for a new addiction recovery program as well - and took in about $90,000 in donations."
        But Zehnder isn't the first person to break a world record for a religious reason. In fact, there are plenty of faith-based achievements in the "Guinness Book of World Records" that believers have won over the years.
        Here are 10 of the top religious world records that most might not have heard of yet.
Largest bible publisher: Zondervan Publishing House
        The largest Bible publisher is Zondervan Publishing House, located in Michigan. According to Guinness World Records, the publisher holds the "exclusive rights to the New International Version of the Bible."
Largest collection of prayer beads: Jamal Sleeq
        Sleeq of Kuwait holds the record for the largest collection of prayer beads with 3,642 total beads, which are made from different rocks and minerals, such as malachite, coral and opal.
Largest Christian denomination: Roman Catholic Church
        The Roman Catholic Church has more Christians than any other religious denomination with more than 1.1 billion members. Its leader, Pope Francis, is one of the most recognizable faces in the world.
Highest proportion of Muslims: Afghanistan
        Afghanistan holds the record for the highest proportion of Muslims in countries across the world with 99.7 percent of the country believing in Islam.
Most visited Hindu temple: Tirupati Temple
         Most won't be alone if they visit the Tirupati Temple in Andhra Pradesh, India. The temple brings in 30,000 to 40,000 people per day, and nearly doubles that number on New Year's Day. According to the "Guinness Book of Records," the temple is also the richest in the world with an annual budget of more than $50 million.
Largest Buddhist temple: Borobudur
        The Tirupati Temple might get a lot of visits, but the Borobudur, in Indonesia, is the largest Buddhist temple in the world at 2,118,8080 cubic feet, according to the record.
Longest marathon church organ playing: Jacqueline Sadler
        What's the longest someone's gone playing the church organ? According to the "Guinness Book of Records", Sadler played the organ for 40 hours, 36 minutes, at the Eastminster United Church in Toronto.
Longest tenure as a church pianist/organist: Martha Godwin
        Sadler may have played the longest in one sitting, but Godwin of the United Methodist Church in South Carolina spent 73 years as a pianist and organist. She started back in April 1940 and finished in 2013.
Oldest church building: Qal-at es Salihiye
        Where will one find the oldest church in the world? Check out a converted house in Qal-at es Salihiye in eastern Syria. It was formerly known as the Dura Europos House, but "in the 1930s, Yale archaeologists dismantled it and rebuilt it back in the United States," according to the "Guinness Book of Records."
First purpose-built church: Aqaba
        The first ever church to be built for a religious purpose is in Aqaba, Jordan. It was built in the 320s and lasted until 363, when an earthquake turned it to rubble.
        Email: hscribner@deseretdigital.com; Twitter: @herbscribner

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