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David Bowie finishes career with a ballad about heaven
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David Bowie, a musician who transcended music, died from a battle with cancer over the weekend. His final song, though, offered an inspirational message about heaven. - photo by Herb Scribner
David Bowie, a musician who transcended music and found himself in movies, art and fashion, died over the weekend from a battle with cancer at the age of 69.

Bowies reach is almost immeasurable, even touching religious leaders and members of faith across the world. For example, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, told the BBC that he was a constant listener of Bowies music.

"I'm very, very saddened to hear of his death, he said. I remember sitting and listening to his songs endlessly in the '70s particularly, and always really relishing what he was, what he did, the impact he had."

And a Vatican official, Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, tweeted out the lyrics to the song Space Oddity following the singers death, Religion News Service reported.

Faith was not lost on Bowie and his family, either. His wife, Iman Bowie, said shes going to rely on her belief in God to help her survive after the loss of her husband.

"The struggle is real but so is God, she said. Sometimes you never know the true value of a moment until it becomes a memory."

In fact, Bowies last music video had some faithful connections, too. The song, from Bowies last album Backstar, was seen as a parting gift for fans, The Telegraph reported. Producers said Bowie planned for the video to be his final message to fans, with the lyrics also meant to serve as a way for Bowie to acknowledge his forthcoming death.

"Look up here, I'm in heaven! Bowie sings to open the song.

The video shows Bowie laying in a hospital bed. Soon thereafter, he is floating above the bed, with a hand from the sky emerging to pull him to heaven.

"Oh, I'll be free," he sings. "Just like that bluebird. Oh, I'll be free."

You can watch the video here.
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