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Can you relate to this hilarious look at people who 'quit Facebook?'
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Would you behave at a party the way you behave on Facebook? This humorous display shows a man very publicly announcing his exit from "the party" (aka Facebook) not a simple goodbye but a loud trumpet followed by a neverending diatribe as to why he is too good to be at the party. - photo by Wendy Jessen
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram they're supposed to be fun places to interact with friends or acquaintances. Well ... socially. Social media should be mostly for fun and networking. Some people, however, take things a little too seriously.

Would you behave at a party the way you behave on Facebook? This humorous display shows a man very publicly announcing his exit from "the party" (aka Facebook) not a simple goodbye but a loud trumpet followed by a neverending diatribe as to why he is too good to be at the party.

However, his true friends can still find him at a "better party" across the street (another social media outlet far superior to Facebook).

Meanwhile, other partygoers are hardly paying any attention to this grand exit.

Seconds after leaving "for good," the man returns holding a baby. "Good news, everyone!"

Imagine how awkward it would be if people behaved in person the way they behave on Facebook and other social media outlets?

Here are a few signs you may be taking your social media ventures a bit too seriously:

  • Grand, dramatic exits. You publicly leave for good then come right back, of course.
  • You're easily offended by others' posts, comments or lack of personal interaction with you.
  • When offended (or feeling a bit passive-aggressive), you delete or block others only to "re-friend" them later. Or worse, you do this more than once. Instead, consider discussing your hurt feelings in person.
  • You use social media the way you use journals or diaries the ones with locks on them. Your whole personal life is on display for everyone.
  • You post passive-aggressive statements, quotes or memes that are obviously pointed at other people. Awkward. These make everyone wonder if your comments are directed toward them, eliciting all sorts of unnecessary apologies.
  • Vague posts to get attention. You post just enough information to make everyone concerned and ask questions about your well-being.
Maybe you've done one or two of these things occasionally. Just don't do this stuff all the time. Keep your social media experience drama free, and make an effort to keep your family's social media time positive.
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