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Archive By Section - Columnists/Editorials


Fun with the Family with Julie Lavender - Start New Year off in fun way

Tinsel and lights have made their way back to the attic just in time for the dawn of a new year. And this year, 2012, the calendar treats us to an extra day, as February 29th leaps onto the page. Lay aside useless resolutions and instead of making preposterous promises and plans to lose pounds, plan one very important objective for 2012 – make loved ones a priority, orchestrating special times with family and friends. Count stars and pick wildflowers; roast marshmallows and camp on the den floor; bake cookies and read books; dance in puddles and chase butterflies. Celebrate 366 ...

December 30, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen - Currency gets bigger, smaller

After the Civil War ended, the once-again unified American currency included $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 bills.

December 30, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Thinking of God with Larry Sheehy - His was the most unusual birth of all

The Bible has a lot to say about the birth of Jesus. All of them are important. But none are more important than the manner of His conception. It could be a misconception on my part, but it seems this is a topic not emphasized as much as it used to be.

December 25, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Parenting Advice with John Rosemond - It's good to just say NO!

At an online source of parenting advice, a mother recently asked a female marriage and family therapist how to handle her eighth-grade daughter's announcement that she and her ninth-grade boyfriend have decided to "prove their love" by having sex. The mother says, "I don't think she's ready to have sex with this boy."

December 23, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen - What became of Rebel gold?

Due to a difficulty in acquiring additional gold and silver bullion, the Confederate Congress closed all three mints after existing bullion had been used up. Therefore, the Confederacy desperately needed some other sources of local currency in order to encourage normal commerce. Many Southern states promptly created their own paper scrip, and the new Confederate Post Office began printing its own "postal currency."

December 23, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Inside Bulloch Business with Jan Moore - Turnout for job fair a sobering reminder

How could you not be moved by the picture on the front of the Statesboro Herald last Thursday showing the massive number of people waiting patiently to apply for a job with Great Dane.

December 19, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Kathy Bradley - Cotton plant prophet

I first noticed it on Sunday - a sycamore leaf, the size of a spread hand and the color of cured tobacco, was stuck in the stems of a cotton plant at the edge of the driveway. Surprisingly, it was still there Wednesday morning, having withstood a couple of days of stiff wind and one day of sustained rain. Obviously, I was meant to take note. I got out of the car and walked to the edge of the field for a closer look.

December 16, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Thinking of God with Larry Sheehy - 'O little town of Bethlehem'

Sometimes we can only wonder at the working of God, and the way he chooses to bring about his ends. It is true that "God moves in a mysterious way, his wonders to perform."

December 16, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen - War creates 2 currencies

By 1850, America's supplies of silver had been nearly exhausted as the mother lodes of silver ore discovered out west had been mined dry. The majority of existing American silver dollars were being melted down and sold back to the mint at greatly inflated prices in order to provide it with silver bullion with which it could mint new coins.

December 16, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Parenting Advice with John Rosemond - Stress, anxiety turning smart parents dumb

Devon Corneal is an attorney and a writer. Her essay, "Can You Hear Me Now? Why Parents Can't Get Kids to Listen," was published online by The Huffington Post (Nov. 3, 2011). In it, Ms. Corneal carps about her children not listening to her. She identifies the three children in question as "a son, a stepson, and the manchild I married." She refers to them as "boys."

December 16, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Inside Bulloch Business with Jan Moore - Some light on horizon for Jenkins County

For the most part, I have reported on our local economy over the last three years. However, something that has continued to be a concern of mine during that time period has been the plight of our neighbors in Jenkins County.

December 12, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch Geneology with Roger Allen - Brannens take 4 paths to Bulloch

Ireland's ancient "septs" were very similar to Scottish "clans." Those groups from which the Bulloch County Brannen's are descended include the "O Braonain" and "Mac Branain" family groupings. The term "Mac" designated "the son of" while the term "O" designated "the grandson of" a ruling warrior.

December 12, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen - Georgia currency pays soldiers

The colonists in British North American quite naturally expected the British Crown to continue to subsidize them. England's rulers, however, had a different idea: they planned on the colonists making them rich. They figured that if all the colonists had was British money, colonial exports and imports would almost exclusively come from and go to Great Britain.

December 12, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


Parenting Advice with John Rosemond - Rules should come first with your child

Someone recently asked if I agree with the currently popular parenting adage that "rules without relationship lead to rebellion."

December 12, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


John Bressler - Find what God has called you to do

I believe it was Confucius who is reported to have said, "Find a job you love, and you will never work again!" I don't know about you, but this rings so true for me as I always had a job that I couldn't wait to get to, wanted to hang around after work just to look over the place and went home feeling that I had put in a good day.

December 10, 2011 | | Columnists/Editorials


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Articles by Section - Columnists/Editorials


Living with Children with John Rosemond: Pull-ups are permissible in special cases

Q: My 23-month-old son does well with potty training when we're at home. We use a "potty bell" and he goes every 90 minutes or so. When we're away from home, however, he seems clueless. He pees in his car seat about 5 minutes into a trip and simply will not use a potty anywhere but at our home or at my mother's (she watches him one day a week at her place). Would pull-ups be a bad thing to use when we leave the house?

September 21, 2014 | John Rosemond Contributing Writer | Columnists/Editorials


Thinking of God with Larry Sheehy: Can you sleep when the wind blows?

Mr. Jones, the owner of a small farm on the coast, advertised for a hired hand. But people were hesitant about working on farms in the area out of fear of the terribly destructive storms that so often threatened buildings, crops and the lives of both people and animals. Consequently, the farmer found it almost impossible to hire anyone to help him with the work.

September 21, 2014 | Larry Sheehy | Columnists/Editorials


Some Kinda Good with Rebekah Faulk: Living the dream through cupcakes and coffee

It's mid-morning on a sunny Saturday, after a satisfying brunch and visit to my local farmers' market. Dressed completely casually with nowhere to be, I stroll along East Main Street in downtown Statesboro to find an inviting sidewalk chalkboard and the doors open wide at CAKE Bakery and Cool Beanz Espresso Bar. Upon entering, I discover much more than cupcakes and caffeine. Here two kindred spirits - one culinary artist and one head coffee geek - have joined forces to make their dreams a reality.

September 21, 2014 | By REBEKAH FAULK | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen: Bulloch County has trouble accepting first 'autoists'

(Note: The following is part of a series of articles looking at the growth of roads and transportation in Georgia and Bulloch County beginning in 1807.)

September 21, 2014 | By ROGER ALLEN Contributing Writer | Columnists/Editorials


Column: Impacts of childhood obesity

Many people are uncomfortable talking about childhood obesity, especially when it comes to their own children. However, ignoring it, or thinking a child will slim down as he or she grows taller, can make things worse.

September 20, 2014 | | Columnists/Editorials


Column: It's time for action

There's been a lot of talk lately about what the Statesboro City Council is going to do about the terrible tragedy that happened at Rude Rudy's a couple of weeks ago. And we've heard a lot of opinions on what the city "should do" and rampant speculation as to why the council won't do it.

September 20, 2014 | | Columnists/Editorials


Living with Children with John Rosemond - It's your child's homework, not yours

Q: I homeschooled my oldest, an 8-year-old boy, until this year. He started third grade in public school in August. As a homeschooling mom, I was not a micromanager and don't want to become one now, but the school virtually insists that parents help with homework. I want him to be independent. What are your thoughts on this?

September 14, 2014 | John Rosemond | Columnists/Editorials


Kathy Bradley - The backs of drawers

I found it in the back of a drawer. I had no idea how long it had been laying in wait.

September 14, 2014 | | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen - First speed limits and early driving ordinances

(Note: The following is part of a series of articles looking at the growth of roads and transportation in Georgia and Bulloch County beginning in 1807.)

September 14, 2014 | Roger Allen | Columnists/Editorials


Thinking of God with Larry Sheehy - He only did it once: the sacrifice of Jesus

According to what may be an apocryphal story, shared by my friend Alan Smith, two visitors were touring the U. S. Naval facility in Annapolis, Maryland. As they followed the tour guide, they noticed several students on their hands and knees examining a courtyard with pencils and clipboards in hand.

September 14, 2014 | Larry Sheehy | Columnists/Editorials


Fun with the Family with Julie Lavender: September splendor awaits those with patience

Sweltering temperatures soaring in the 90-degree range makes one wonder if autumn will ever return below the Mason-Dixon line, but with prayers and patience, Southerners too will soon enjoy the splendor of September fall days. Beautiful hues of orange and yellow and red lay hidden until the shorter days of September.

September 07, 2014 | Julie Lavender | Columnists/Editorials


Living with Children with John Rosemond: Early bedtimes work for teens, too

New research finds that teens whose school days begin later than the national norm of approximately eight o'clock achieve at higher levels than teens who start school earlier. The researchers in question recommend that that school start times be extended to at least 8:30 am.

September 07, 2014 | John Rosemond | Columnists/Editorials


Some Kinda Good with Rebekah Faulk: South & Vine Public House burned but not broken

During the summer of 2013, just six months after an intriguing new restaurant popped up in downtown Statesboro on the corner of South Main and West Vine streets, I ventured inside to discover a restaurant that would become the backbone of our community and so much more.

September 07, 2014 | By REBEKAH FAULK | Columnists/Editorials


Bulloch History with Roger Allen: The first automobile arrives in Bulloch County

(Note: The following is part of a series of articles looking at the growth of roads and transportation in Georgia and Bulloch County beginning in 1807.)

September 07, 2014 | Roger Allen | Columnists/Editorials


Parenting Advice with John Rosemond - Happy kids get old-fashioned parenting

As the old parenting point of view fell out of fashion beginning in the late 1960s, the vernacular that accompanied it all but completely disappeared. Today's parents don't say to their children the sorts of things parents said to children in the 1950s and before, things like "You're acting too big for your britches again, young man."

August 31, 2014 | John Rosemond Contributing Writer | Columnists/Editorials


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