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NSDAR celebrates Georgia Day

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Posted: February 12, 2008 8:05 p.m.
Updated: February 27, 2008 5:00 a.m.
NSDAR celebrates Georgia Day

The Bulloch County Chapter of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) celebrated Georgia Day Tuesday with a luncheon featuring speaker David Tribble, president of Savannah's historical Bethesda Home for Boys.


    The Bulloch County Chapter of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) celebrated Georgia Day Tuesday with a luncheon featuring speaker David Tribble, president of Savannah's historical Bethesda Home for Boys.
    The luncheon was held at Statesboro's First Baptist church in the Perry Fellowship Hall.
    According to Internet web site en.wikipedia.org, "Georgia Day is the holiday which the U.S. state of Georgia recognizes in honor of its colonial founding as the Province of Georgia."
    The Bulloch Chapter NSDAR celebrates annually with a program featuring Georgia History.
    According to information provided by NSDAR member Libba Smith, Bethesda is the oldest children's home in the United States, Founded in 1740, it was originally an orphanage for both sexes but became a boys' home in 1801.
    Tribble has served as the home's president for the past 17 years, and before that served as executive director of the Ellen Hines Smith Girl's Home in Spartanburg, SC.
    Tribble spoke of Bethesda's history, touching upon the life of founder Rev. George Whitefield, whose "ministry had intrigued (Tribble) since his seminary days," Smith said.
    Whitefield was a very spiritual person, Tribble said, speaking about how Whitefield befriended John Wesley and followed him from Oxford to Savannah. However, it was Wesley's brother Charles who inspired Whitefield to build and orphanage, Tribble said.
    After Bethesda was built Whitefield hired James Habersham as school master. Tribble also spoke of how Whitefield's unorthodox and passionate ideas helped fill a need in a land where "church" meetings were held in fields or town squares, bringing the word of God to those who felt they did not fit into the more socially structured church settings that were available in  that day.
    Tribble called Whitefield's spiritual messages "poignant, powerfully delivered and personally challenging" and said Whitefield impressed Ben Franklin immensely.
     Whitefield felt " a love for God, a love for learning and a strong work ethic" were key points in raising children, he said.
    After Tribble's presentation, NSDAR members presented him with a gift basket including grapefruit and oranges raised in Bulloch County by a member, as well as a check for $100 for the Bethesda Home for Boys, which currently houses 80 young men.
    Before Tribble's speech, NSDAR members recited the Pledge of Allegiance to the Georgia flag as well as the national flag: "I pledge allegiance to the Georgia flag and to the principles for which it stands: wisdom, justice and moderation."
    The meeting ended after the group sang the state song, "Georgia on my Mind."
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