View Mobile Site

  • Bookmark and Share

Friends to Follow

Most Popular Articles

There are no articles at this time.

Event

La. agriculture minister says Africanized honeybees appear established near New Orleans

Text Size: Small Large Medium
Posted: September 15, 2007 2:12 p.m.
Updated: September 30, 2007 5:00 a.m.
    MERAUX, La. — Africanized honeybees, a fierce hybrid strain sometimes referred to as ‘‘killer bees,’’ appear to have established themselves in the New Orleans area, the state agriculture commissioner said.
    A swarm of the bees was captured about five miles from where demolition workers found a colony of Africanized bees in January, commissioner Bob Odom said Tuesday.
    The most recent find was close enough to the earlier find that the bees might have come from the same colony. But they might also have flown ashore from a passing ship or barge, Odom said in a news release.
    ‘‘Although the exact source can’t be identified, we have to assume Africanized honeybees are now established in the area and people should be careful when working outside,’’ Odom said.
    The Department of Agriculture and Forestry keeps traps along a north-south line through the state and at all deepwater ports to monitor the bees, which are smaller and more aggressive than the European honeybees raised for honey.
    ‘‘Because Africanized bees have been labeled ’killer bees’ for years, there’s an idea around that they are bigger than European honeybees,’’ Odom said. ‘‘The truth is they’re actually smaller but a lot fiercer.’’
    They have the same venom as honeybees, but attack in groups. Experts recommend that anyone confronted with Africanized bees find cover quickly.
    Africanized bees are the result of an experiment to increase honey production in Brazil. A swarm escaped a lab in 1957 and headed north. When they mated with native strains, the offspring were as aggressive as the African parents.
    They reached Texas in 1990 and have spread west to California and east to Florida. They were first found in Louisiana in Caddo Parish, in June 2005, and identified the following month. They have moved steadily east since then, and were most recently found near Pecan Island and Turkey Creek.

SUBSCRIBE to the Statesboro Herald print edition or online e-Edition and get EXCLUSIVE news and information online with complete access to all complete stories on statesboroherald.com. Now you'll have Soundoff, Local Birth Announcements and columnists like Jan Moore, Larry Sheehy, Kathy Bradley, John Bressler and Holli Bragg. Also, Letters to the Editor, Local Editorials and many new exclusive items will all be there just for you! And, when you're away from home, you can read the paper page by page anywhere, anytime from your computer with your subscription.

COMMENTS

SUBMIT A COMMENT

Commenting is not available.

Hot Topics

Most Popular

Commenting not available.

Please wait ...