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Bush moves toward showdown with Congress over demands for documents and testimony

    WASHINGTON — President Bush, in a constitutional showdown with Congress, claimed executive privilege Thursday and rejected demands for White House documents and testimony about the firing of U.S. attorneys.
    His decision was denounced as ‘‘Nixonian stonewalling’’ by the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
    Bush rejected subpoenas for documents from former presidential counsel Harriet Miers and former political director Sara Taylor. The White House made clear neither one would testify next month, as directed by the subpoenas.
    Presidential counsel Fred Fielding said Bush had made a reasonable attempt at compromise but Congress forced the confrontation by issuing subpoenas. ‘‘With respect, it is with much regret that we are forced down this unfortunate path which we sought to avoid by finding grounds for mutual accommodation.’’
    The assertion of executive privilege was the latest turn in increasingly hostile standoffs between the administration and the Democratic-controlled Congress over the Iraq war, executive power, the war on terror and Vice President Dick Cheney’s authority. A day earlier, the Senate Judiciary Committee delivered subpoenas to the offices of Bush, Cheney, the national security adviser and the Justice Department about the administration’s warrantless wiretapping program.
    While weakened by the Iraq war and poor approval ratings in the polls, Bush has been adamant not to cede ground to Congress.
    ‘‘Increasingly, the president and vice president feel they are above the law,’’ said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
    Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said Bush’s assertion of executive privilege was ‘‘unprecedented in its breadth and scope’’ and displayed ‘‘an appalling disregard for the right of the people to know what is going on in their government.’’
    White House press secretary Tony Snow weighed in with unusually sharp criticism of Congress. He accused Democrats of trying ‘‘to make life difficult for the White House. It also may explain why this is the least popular Congress in decades, because you do have what appears to be a strategy of destruction, rather than cooperation.’’
    Over the years, Congress and the White House have avoided a full-blown court test about the constitutional balance of power and whether the president can refuse demands from Congress. Lawmakers could vote to cite witnesses for contempt and refer the matter to the local U.S. attorney to bring before a grand jury. Since 1975, 10 senior administration officials have been cited but the disputes were all resolved before getting to court.
    Congressional committees sought the documents and testimony in their investigations of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales’ stewardship of the Justice Department and the firing of eight federal attorneys over the winter. Democrats say the firings were an example of improper political influence. The White House contends that U.S. attorneys are political appointees who can be hired and fired for almost any reason.
    In a letter to Leahy and Conyers, Fielding said Bush had ‘‘attempted to chart a course of cooperation’’ by releasing more than 8,500 pages of documents and sending Gonzales and other officials to Capitol Hill to testify.
    The president also had offered to make Miers, Taylor, political strategist Karl Rove and their aides available to be interviewed by the Judiciary committees in closed-door sessions, without transcripts and not under oath. Leahy and Conyers rejected that proposal.
    The Senate Judiciary Committee’s senior Republican, Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, said the House and Senate panels should accept Bush’s original offer.
    Impatient with the ‘‘lagging’’ pace of the investigation into the U.S. attorney firings, Specter said he asked Fielding during a phone call Wednesday night whether the president would agree to transcripts on the interviews. Fielding’s answer: No.
    ‘‘I think we ought to take what information we can get now and try to wrap this up,’’ Specter told reporters. That wouldn’t preclude Congress from reissuing subpoenas if lawmakers do not get enough answers, Specter said.
    Fielding explained Bush’s position on executive privilege this way: ‘‘For the president to perform his constitutional duties, it is imperative that he receive candid and unfettered advice and that free and open discussions and deliberations occur among his advisers and between those advisers and others within and outside the Executive Branch.’’
    This ‘‘bedrock presidential prerogative’’ exists, in part, to protect the president from being compelled to disclose such communications to Congress, Fielding argued.
    In a slap at the committees, Fielding said, ‘‘There is no demonstration that the documents and information you seek by subpoena are critically important to any legislative initiatives that you may be pursuing or intending to pursue.’’
    It was the second time in his administration that Bush has exerted executive privilege, said White House deputy press secretary Tony Fratto. The first instance was in December 2001, to rebuff Congress’ demands for Clinton administration documents.
    The most famous claim of executive privilege was in 1974, when President Nixon went to the Supreme Court to avoid surrendering White House tape recordings in the Watergate scandal. That was in a criminal investigation, not a demand from Congress. The court unanimously ordered Nixon to turn over the tapes.
    ———
    On the Net:
    Senate Judiciary Committee: http://judiciary.senate.gov/
    House Judiciary Committee: http://judiciary.house.gov/
    White House: http://www.whitehouse.gov

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