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Dear Abby 4/26

Pregnant woman all alone must find legal protection

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DEAR ABBY: I am 24 years old and pregnant by a married man. I didn't find out that he was married until after I learned I was pregnant. I love him so much, and he swears he loves me, too.
    He has not told his wife anything about me or his expected child. I am afraid to tell my family that he's still married. He has promised me that he's going to leave his wife, but I don't see that happening. Please tell me what to do. -- ALL ALONE IN EUSTIS, FLA.
    DEAR ALL ALONE: First of all, tell your family what is going on. It appears you are going to need all the emotional support they can give you.
    This man has lied and misrepresented himself to you from the beginning, so don't expect him to suddenly stand up and act like a man now. Give him a clear choice. Either he leaves his wife, or you are going to a lawyer. If he doesn't follow through on his promise to you, a lawyer is what you will need to ensure that he provides financially not only for his child, but also for your prenatal care.

    DEAR ABBY: I have recently begun taking a two-hour bus ride to a nearby city on the weekends. I always buy a round-trip ticket, as I take the last bus back at night. I park my car near the bus terminal, and the same clerk always waits on me when I come in.
    I began to notice that most of my fellow passengers had a different-colored ticket than mine. I didn't pay much attention to it at first. I now realize that the clerk has been selling me "senior" tickets, the kind that are reserved for people age 65 and older.
    Abby, I have more than 10 years before I turn 65. By today's standards, this is far from old. This has caused me considerable embarrassment. I want to continue using the service, but I want to have the proper ticket. I think these employees should be given some sensitivity training. I'd like your thoughts on "senior citizen" discounts. -- UPSET IN UTICA, N.Y.
    DEAR UPSET: The age of eligibility for senior discounts can begin from a person's mid-50s, and they can be a blessing for people who are no longer working and living on fixed incomes. The clerk may have been trying to do you a favor.
    Instead of being embarrassed or upset, inform the clerk that although you appreciate his/her attempt to save you money, you are not yet eligible for the discount and would prefer to pay the full fare. That should solve your problem.

    DEAR ABBY: I am a freshman in high school, and my parents are divorced. My mother lives in Florida and my dad lives in Ohio. By June, I will have to choose which one of them I want to live with — which will mean not seeing the other one for three-quarters of the year.
    I love both my parents and hate going through this. Do you have any advice for me? -- DIFFICULT CHOICE, BALTIMORE, OHIO
    DEAR DIFFICULT CHOICE: My heart goes out to you because I know this is a difficult time and a wrenching decision to make. However, because your e-mail address is in the name of "Hellraisin' Devil," you should choose the parent who will be able to provide you with the most supervision until you're out of high school.
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